Movement at UNE

Ryan DeLuca

April 21, 2019

ENG 123

Dr. Drown

Anti-Racism Movement

Movements are started when a bunch of people agree with what you are trying to accomplish when trying to advertise the movement. When the civil rights movement started it started with a group of people with strong ties with each other who thought the same thing, then as word got out that the strong tie group were protesting civil rights people with weak ties with the group who may or may not have talked to any of the civil rights activists before joined the protest.

For a movement to be started at the University of New England I don’t think would be very difficult, a majority of the UNE community I feel have very similar views on certain subjects such as Race. If one person were to be racially profiled on campus I believe some sort of action would be taken to do something about the person who racially profiled that person. For there to be a protest on campus about one person being racially profiled, I think it would be difficult to start a movement just from a single incident. People don’t like to act the first time an incident happens but only after its happened multiple times, because after a racial incident has happened multiple times in a week or month then people start to see that something is wrong and think, we should do something about it. A lot of white people deny there is a race issue simply because they don’t see an issue or don’t hear about many race confrontations. With that said in order for there to be a movement over anti-racism, the community at UNE would have to see a problem with racism on campus, and since there is such a small percentage of black students on campus I think the community would have a hard time seeing a problem because the black community at UNE is so small so they don’t really have a huge voice.

I also believe since the black population is small and is mixed with the predominantly white community I think the black students could easily get people in their friend group together to start a movement for anti-racism because their strong ties are the people that listen to them the most. The black community’s voice may be small, but since some of the black community made friends with the white community this creates a bigger voice by adding numbers to the anti-racism movement. The types of issues I think the movement would run into is skepticism, people thinking that there isn’t a race problem, so they will just ignore the activist. We would use examples of racist acts that happened as examples to show that there is a problem. A social habit we would promote would be equality, We would promote these new social habits, everyone should practice including everyone regardless of race for any activity. If you see someone sitting by themselves, don’t profile them and watch them sit alone. Invite him or her over to sit with you; you never know you might just make a lifelong friend by being inclusive. Awareness would be a big part of the Anti-racism movement, that would be the achilleas heal of the movement, informing everyone of the issues that are happening all over America and all over the world.

Essay 4 -Final

Ryan DeLuca 

April 7th, 2019 

ENG 123 

Dr. Drown  

Is there a solution to Racism? 

Race has been an issue all around the world and there seems to be no definitive way to stop it. I examined multiple sources to try and come to a conclusion if race is real and to see in what ways millennials and professional’s think about race. Now let’s talk about how people in the whiteness and blackness project both acknowledge…. professionals thought on race relate to reality and then think about what it would take to put a stop to racism.  

After watching and listening to a documentary called the whiteness project I was shocked to hear this is how millennials think about race, a lot of the speakers acknowledged that there is a bias towards white people but also take advantage of the perks of being white, they see the issue but it doesn’t seem like they try and stop it. One person from the Whiteness Project named Connor who is white pointed out that he would have been in prison if he wasn’t white he also thinks the reason he hasn’t gotten in big trouble is because he’s white, Connor says “I always kind of knew that if I got in trouble I could get a lawyer, suit up, show up and it would be a slap on the wrist.” Connor has been arrested multiple times for possession of drugs but has never gotten charged or put in jailAnother person from the whiteness project voiced his opinion on race his name is Wade, he says “The people that say the most awful things that I’ve ever heard in person are those people, are those white people that get drunk and sit at my bar and spout off nonsense and makes me really disappointed that I have to be lumped into the same category as them.” From Wades point of view, he is disappointed that he is categorized the same as white people because of the awful things that white people did in the past. 

After the whiteness project was created it was talked about a lot on the T.V and some people in the black community thought it would be cool to do the same style documentary but getting the opinions from black people in the black community the documentary is called The Blackness Project. The Blackness project is made the same way the Whiteness project was created minus the white people, it was created by interviewing black people and getting their opinions on what they think about race in American and what they think the issue is. In the Blackness project some shared their personal experiences of racial inequality, a woman named Verniece shares an issue she sees and experiences in the work force she says, “If you go into a bunch of folks, you’ll realize that we work just as hard if not harder, because often times my grandfather said you gotta be twice as good in order to get half the credit.” Verniece grew up in the racially divided America of the 60’s she experienced firsthand racial inequality especially in the work place, when she was growing up like Verniece stated blacks had to put in double the effort in order to get partial credit, we have come along way at combatting racial inequality in the work force, but we still have some ground to cover. The racial inequality among work places and other places has caused the black community to “Cover” their true identity and show a more stream lined, a more professional man or woman to make a statement. 

Kenji Yoshino is the creator of the concept of covering, Yoshino says people use covering to protect themselves and that’s exactly what a man named Ramon Ray has done. Ray is business entrepreneur he dresses business casual because he wants to look professional but that didn’t stop people from profiling him as “The Help”, white people also profile black men as “Menacing” or violent so to combat this he started keeping his distance from white woman in order to make sure he isn’t disturbing the peace just by minding his own business, Ray had to change is behavior to keep away from white woman in certain areas even though he is probably a nice guy and would greet them nicely with a smile. Verniece adds to this by stating, “I always knew that we were black, and I had an obligation and a responsibility to conduct myself in a most skillful way and that is one thing that I am grateful for and being raised in a family that was conscious of not only our selves but the society in which we operated in.” In order to maximize the chances of success black families had to raise their children with high standards set to ensure their children have a chance to break past the racial barriers. If raising your kids to the highest standards doesn’t seem to be breaking down racial barriers, what will it take for racism to be done with? 

One man seems to have the answer to racial division, his name is Steve Olson and he wrote an article about how mixed Hawaii is and if racial mixing would solve the problem of race he also talked about is race is genetic or if its mythological. In his article stated Hawaii’s high rate of intermarriage has painted the picture in our heads that in order for racial tensions to diminish everyone would need to be racially mixed. But Steve Olson proved this to be wrong Olson says, “Despite the high rate of intermarriage here, ethnic and racial tensions haven’t really disappeared.” Although Hawaii has the highest rate of intermarriage people still think that there racial mixing is better than someone else’s racial mixing someone may be mixed with people that have had power in the past or be related to royalty, some people think the more mixed you are the better you are even though they all may have started in the same spot and more than likely have similar racial mixing. This makes the argument that mixing everyone racially would solve racism, it really wouldn’t, a new issue would arise yes, we would all look alike but some would be mixed more than others and they would use that to their advantage. 

Alright so if mixing everyone won’t solve the race issue, we have here on planet earth then what will solve this issue? I personally think racism will eventually make its way out, with all the history and with all the knowledge about racism it will be difficult to end racism tomorrow this is something that takes time 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literature Cited  

“The Invention of Race | Specials.” WNYC, New York Public Radio, www.wnyc.org/story/invention-race/. 

Hauser, Christine. “How Professionals of Color Say They Counter Bias at Work.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 12 Dec. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/12/12/us/racial-bias-work.html. 

Yoshino, Kenji. “The New Civil Rights.” The New Civil Rights, pp. 479–490. 

 “Whiteness Project.” Whiteness Projectwww.whitenessproject.org/millennials. 

“The Blackness Project | Black Rose Production House” SkoVu TV, skovutv.pivotshare.com/media/the-blackness-project/72976/preview. 

Essay 4 – draft

Ryan DeLuca

April 7th, 2019

ENG 123

Dr. Drown

Is there a solution to racism?

Race has been an issue all around the world and there seems to be no definitive way to stop it. I examined multiple sources to try and come to a conclusion if race is real and to see in what ways millennials and professional’s think about race. Now let’s talk about how millennials and professionals thought on race relate to reality and then think about what it would take to put a stop to racism.

After watching and listening to a documentary called the whiteness project I was shocked to hear this is how millennials think about race, a lot of the speakers acknowledged that there is a bias towards white people. One person from the Whiteness Project named Connor who is white pointed out that he would have been in prison if he wasn’t white he also thinks the reason he hasn’t gotten in big trouble is because he’s white, Connor says “I always kind of knew that if I got in trouble I could get a lawyer, suit up, show up and it would be a slap on the wrist.” Connor has been arrested multiple times for possession of drugs but has never gotten charged or put in jail. Another person from the whiteness project voiced his opinion on race his name is Wade, he says “The people that say the most awful things that I’ve ever heard in person are those people, are those white people that get drunk and sit at my bar and spout off nonsense and makes me really disappointed that I have to be lumped into the same category as them.” From Wades point of view, he is disappointed that he is categorized the same as white people because of the awful things that white people did in the past.

After the whiteness project was created it was talked about a lot on the T.V and some people in the black community thought it would be cool to do the same style documentary but getting the opinions from black people in the black community the documentary is called The Blackness Project. The Blackness project is made the same way the whiteness project was created minus the white people, it was created by interviewing black people and getting their opinions on what they think about race in American and what they think the issue is. In the Blackness project some shared their personal experiences of racial inequality, a woman named Verniece shares an issue she sees and experiences in the work force she says, “If you go into a bunch of folks, you’ll realize that we work just as hard if not harder, because often times my grandfather said you gotta be twice as good in order to get half the credit.” Verniece grew up in the racially divided America of the 60’s she experienced firsthand racial inequality especially in the work place, when she was growing up like Verniece stated blacks had to put in double the effort in order to get partial credit, we have come along way at combatting racial inequality in the work force, but we still have some ground to cover. The racial inequality among work places and other places has caused the black community to “Cover” their true identity and show a more stream lined, a more professional man or woman to make a statement.

Kenji Yoshino is the creator of the concept of covering, Yoshino says people use coving to protect them-selves and that’s exactly what a man named Ramon Ray has done. Ray is a business entrepreneur he dresses business casual because he wants to look professional but that didn’t stop people from profiling him as “The Help”, white people also profile black men as “Menacing” or violent so to combat this he started keeping his distance from white woman in order to make sure he isn’t disturbing the peace just by minding his own business, Ray had to change is behavior to keep away from white woman in certain areas even though he is probably a nice guy and would greet them nicely with a smile. Verniece adds to this by stating, “I always knew that we were black, and I had an obligation and a responsibility to conduct myself in a most skillful way and that is one thing that I am grateful for and being raised in a family that was conscious of not only our selves but the society in which we operated in.” In order to maximize the chances of success black families had to raise their children with high standards set to ensure their children have a chance to break past the racial barriers. If raising your kids to the highest standards doesn’t seem to be breaking down racial barriers, what will it take for racism to be done with?

One man seems to have the answer to racial division, his name is Steve Olson and he wrote an article about how mixed    Hawaii is and if racial mixing would solve the problem of race he also talked about is race is genetic or if its mythological. In his article stated Hawaii’s high rate of intermarriage has painted the picture in our heads that in order for racial tensions to diminish everyone would need to be racially mixed. But Steve Olson proved this to be wrong Olson says, “Despite the high rate of intermarriage here, ethnic and racial tensions haven’t really disappeared.” Although Hawaii has the highest rate of intermarriage people still think that there racial mixing is better than someone else’s racial mixing someone may be mixed with people that have had power in the past or be related to royalty, some people think the more mixed you are the better you are even though they all may have started in the same spot and more than likely have similar racial mixing. This makes the argument that mixing everyone racially would solve the racism, it really wouldn’t, a new issue would arise yes, we would all look alike but some would be mixed more than others and they would use that to their advantage.

Alright so if mixing everyone won’t solve the race issue we have here on planet earth then what will solve this issue? I personally think racism will eventually make its way out, with all the history and with all the knowledge about racism it will be difficult to end racism tomorrow this is something that takes time. In order to ensure racism makes its way-out politicians need to stop using the word so liberally and calling every part of our economy racist in order to gain votes. Part of the reason it’s been sticking around is because politicians use it as ammo to help their political agenda which isn’t right. What I think would help with racism in America specifically is to have politicians stop using race as ammo to gain followers and power only to do nothing about the issue.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Literature Cited

Hauser, Christine. “How Professionals of Color Say They Counter Bias at Work.” The New York Times, The New York Times, 12 Dec. 2018, www.nytimes.com/2018/12/12/us/racial-bias-work.html.

Yoshino, Kenji. “The New Civil Rights.” The New Civil Rights, pp. 479–490.

This is the PDF so you can see all the MLA stuff

Essay 4 – Revised

Ryan DeLuca

April 7th, 2019

ENG 123

Dr. Drown

Is there a solution to racism?

Race has been an issue all around the world and there seems to be no definitive way to stop it. I examined multiple sources to try and come to a conclusion if race is even real and what ways people think about race that relate to reality and finally what it would take to put a stop to racism.

After watching and listening to the documentary called the whiteness project I was shocked to hear that this is how millennials think about race, a lot of them acknowledged that there is a bias white being more favored over blacks one person from the Whiteness Project named Connor who is white pointed out that he would have been in prison if he wasn’t white he also thinks the reason the hammer hasn’t been brought down on him is because he’s white, Connor says “I always kind of knew that if I got in trouble I could get a lawyer, suit up, show up and it would be a slap on the wrist.” Connor has been arrested multiple times for possession of drugs but has never gotten charged or put in jail. Another person from the whiteness project voiced his opinion on race his name is Wade, he says “The people that say the most awful things that I’ve ever heard in person are those people, are those white people that get drunk and sit at my bar and spout off nonsense and makes me really disappointed that I have to be lumped into the same category as them.” From Wades point of view, he is disappointed that he is categorized the same as the drunk people who speak gibberish at his bar Wade probably reaps the benefits of being white without knowing but if he had any control over it he would probably give up those benefits.

There is another documentary that was created in response to the whiteness project called The Blackness Project. The Blackness project is made the same way the whiteness project was created minus the white people, it was created by interviewing black people and getting their opinions on what they think about race in American and where they think the issue is. In this documentary some shared their personal experiences of racial inequality, a woman named Verniece says “If you go into a bunch of folks, you’ll realize that we work just as hard if not harder, because often times my grandfather said you gotta be twice as good in order to get half the credit.” Verniece grew up in the racially divided America of the 60’s she experienced firsthand racial inequality especially in the workplace, when she was growing up like Verniece stated blacks had to put in double the effort in order to get partial credit, we have come along way at combatting that issue, but we still have some ground to cover. All of this racial inequality among workplaces and other places has caused the black community to try and change the way they are portrayed by covering their true self and showing and over the top very professional clean as a whistle man or woman as a statement. A man named Ramon Ray has a story it is about his as a business entrepreneur, he dresses business casual because he wants to look professional but that didn’t stop people from profiling him as “The Help”, white people also profile black men as “Menacing” or violent so to combat this he started keeping his distance from white woman in particular in order to make sure he isn’t disturbing the peace just by minding his own business. Verniece adds to this by stating, “I always knew that we were black, and I had an obligation and a responsibility to conduct myself in a most skillful way and that is one thing that I am grateful for and being raised in a family that was conscious of not only our selves but the society in which we operated in.” In order to maximize the chances of success, black families had to raise their children with high standards set to ensure their children have a chance to break past the racial barriers. If raising your kids to the highest standards don’t seem to be breaking down racial barriers, what will it take for racism to be done with?

One person seems to have the answer, his name is Steve Olson and he wrote an article about how mixed Hawaii is and if racial mixing would solve the problem of race he also talked about is race is genetic or if it’s mythological. In his article stated Hawaii’s high rate of intermarriage has painted the picture in our heads that in order for racial tensions to diminish everyone would need to be racially mixed. But Steve Olson proved this to be wrong Olson says, “Despite the high rate of intermarriage here, ethnic and racial tensions haven’t really disappeared.” Although Hawaii has the highest rate of intermarriage people still think that there racial mixing is better than someone else’s racial mixing someone may be mixed with people that have had power in the past or be related to royalty, some people think the more mixed you are the better you are even though they all may have started in the same spot and more than likely have similar racial mixing. This makes the argument that mixing everyone racially would solve the racism, it really wouldn’t, a new issue would arise, yes we would all look alike but some would be mixed more than others and they would use that to their advantage.

Essay 3 – Final

Ryan DeLuca

March 1, 2019

ENG123

Dr. Drown

Identity

Our social identity isn’t shaped by ourselves, our social identity is created by the people around us, what our peers say and think will have an impact on our social identity. Our social identity very much effects our personal identity, it will reshape what we think but not necessarily how we feel, for example, you and a couple of friends may have never smoked before but one of them has, personally you may feel drugs are bad but since your friends want to try it you feel obliged to try it. Another way of thinking about social identity is how they shape our life paths, your personal identity may have you pointed in one direction, a life of wealth and prosperity, but since our social identity is so influential the social identity may point you in the opposite direction from wealth and prosperity to poverty and suffrage. The American dream can be accomplished in multiple different ways the other outlier that would keep you from becoming successful in the workspace is, drugs or a criminal record. From Coates to Rose they both were shaped by their neighborhoods but both in two different experiences with similar outcomes.

Coates was shaped by the violence surrounding him as well as his parents fear of seeing him consumed by the never-ending drugs and violence that’s present on the streets. Coates parents were especially scared for him and tried everything they could to keep him safe and on the right path to greatness. Coates parent’s used physical lessons to try and point him in the right direction, “I remember watching him in a kind of daze, awed at the distance between punishment and offense. Later, I would hear it in Dad’s voice—“Either I can beat him, or the police.”(pp.16) Coates parents did what they thought was right to ensure their son wouldn’t become a statistic. It was difficult to grow up black because in the decade Coates was a child blacks were still being suppressed, discriminated against and targeted simply because of their difference in skin color, Coates adds “Maybe that saved me. Maybe it didn’t. All I know is, the violence rose from the feet like smoke from a fire, and I cannot say weather that violence, even administered in fear and love, sounded the alarm or choked us at the exit.”(pp.17) Coates childhood wasn’t your regular childhood, in his tough neighborhood you had to grow up quickly or you were very likely to join or be killed by the streets. Coates experiences in his society when trying to create his personal identity, group violence, personal fear and physical abuse these all shaped Ta – Nehisi Coates into the man he is now.

Mike Rose had a similar but different experience growing up. Rose parents moved from Italy to American in hopes of starting a better life for themselves, when Rose parents first came to America they lived on the east side of America. His mother and father opened a spaghetti house in Pennsylvania that was successful up until the railroad had to stop production in the area then the shop had gone bankrupt. Rose says, “My parents managed to salvage seven hundred dollars and, on the advice of the family doctor, headed to California, where the winters would be mild and where I, their seven-year-old son, would have the possibility of a brighter future.”(pp.12) Rose had an easier childhood, it was a dreamy childhood but he had the chance to be a kid longer, he was lucky enough that his parents would buy him stuff to stimulate his creativity such as a chemistry set he received on Christmas one year, “One early Christmas they got me a small chemistry set. My father brought home an old card table from the secondhand store, and on that table, I spread out my test tubes, my beaker, my Erlenmeyer flask, and my test tubes, my gas-generating apparatus.”(pp.19) Rose had a childhood that wasn’t filled with fear of being jumped or being caught in gang violence because he didn’t fit the criteria so the gang members in his area left him alone. It was much easier to grow up light-skinned, being light skinned during this time meant you weren’t discriminated against, suppressed or targeted. That doesn’t mean he didn’t have dangers lurking around his neighborhood.

The types of danger in Rose neighborhood were similar to Coates but the surrounding gangs didn’t have any interest in Rose if anything happened to Rose it would have most likely been an accident. There was one story Rose was telling about what he experienced in his neighborhood, “One night I watched as a guy sprinted from Walt’s to toss something on our lawn. The police were right behind, and a cop tackled him, smashing his face into the sidewalk. I ducked out to find the packet: a dozen glassine bags of heroin.”(pp.17) Rose came in contact with drugs not only with this situation but with the people that were living with him at the time, one of the guy’s name was Lester, “… Lester, the toothless cabbie, who several times made overtures to me and who, when he moved, left behind a drawer full of syringes and burnt spoons.”(pp.16) Not only did he have drugs around him he also had an old man asking for sexual favors. Rose and Coates had similar dangers during the course of their childhood’s, but Rose was out to find danger while danger found Coates they both found their way up and out of these dangerous neighborhoods.

Rose neighborhood compared to Coates sound very similar, they both have a crazy neighborhood shop owner, they both have groups of “bad boys” also called gangs who roam the streets causing trouble. Coates dangers were more likely to consume him, he could have easily been abducted and could have easily been shot or become a drug dealer. But, that didn’t happen to him, he stayed safe he took school seriously but also had to take the street seriously at the same time. School might have been the best thing Coates could have done to pull himself away from the dangers of the streets and neighborhood, school kept him safe and allowed him to chart a new path to greatness. Coates had a harder time growing up because he was battling race and prejudice growing up, out of Coates and Rose, Coates was more likely to have become part of the streets than Rose. Coates uses this analogy to describe what racism is and how he thinks it was created.  “But race is the child of racism, not the father.”(pp.7) The but in the sentence refers to a sentence in the paragraph above “In this way, racism is rendered as the innocent daughter of Mother Nature…”(pp.7)How these two quotes link together is such a complex and deep topic, the first sentence gives us the idea that Racism came before race and the daughter of mother nature is Racism. This is a very complex sentence to think with, it’s hard to understand, Coates says everything that we think we know backwards and says it in such a way to get you to think about it.

What I’ve learned about Social and Personal identities has changed some of my thinking on how our different and diverse societies shape our social and personal identities. I never put much thought into it but the atmosphere we are raised in has a huge impact on how we act and what we think and that ultimately shapes our personal identity. The neighborhood that Coates grew up in and his race had a huge impact on how he grew up as well as his perspective on life. Rose didn’t have much trouble because he didn’t struggle with race and his parents had enough money to be able to provide him with gifts to spur his creativity. What Rose had growing up was opportunity and fewer weights holding him down, from Coates perspective he didn’t have much opportunity if he wanted opportunity he had to work for it and I mean really work hard for it. These readings gave me a new perspective on how our social identity is created, it’s not only created by your friends and the people you hang out with it’s shaped by the society you are raised in, your social identity becomes your personal identity.

Work Cited

Coates, Ta-Nehisi. Between the World and Me. Spiegel & Grau, 2015.

Rose, Mike. “I Just Wanna Be Average.” Lives on The Boundary, Penguin, 1989, pp. 11–37.

Essay 3 – Draft 2

Ryan DeLuca

March 1, 2019

ENG123

Dr. Drown

Edited Draft

Our social identity isn’t shaped by ourselves, our social identity is created by the people around us, what they say and think will shape our social identity. Our social identity very much effects our personal identity, it will re shape what we think but not necessarily how we feel for example you and a couple of friends may have never smoked before but one of them has, personally you may feel drugs are bad but since your friends want to try it you feel obliged to try it. Another way of thinking about social identity is how they shape our life paths, your personal identity may have you pointed in one direction a life of wealth and prosperity, but since our social identity is so influential the social identity may point you in the opposite direction from wealth and prosperity to poverty and suffrage. The American dream can be accomplished in multiple different ways the other outlier they would keep you from becoming successful in the work space is drugs or a criminal record. From Coates to Rose they both were shaped by their neighborhoods but both in two different ways with similar outcomes.

Coates was shaped by the violence surrounding him and his parents fear of seeing him consumed by the drugs and violence of the streets. Coates parents were especially scared for him, Coates parent’s used physical lessons to try and point him in the right direction, “I remember watching him in a kind of daze, awed at the distance between punishment and offense. Later, I would hear it in Dad’s voice—“Either I can beat him, or the police.” Coates parents did what they had to do to ensure he wouldn’t become a statistic, it was difficult to grow up black because in the decade Coates was a child, blacks were still suppressed, discriminated against and targeted simply because of their difference in skin color, Coates adds “Maybe that saved me. Maybe it didn’t. All I know is, the violence rose from the feat like smoke form a fire, and I cannot say weather that violence, even administered in fear and love, sounded the alarm or choked us at the exit.” Coates childhood wasn’t your regular childhood, in his tough neighborhood you had to grow up quickly or you were very likely to join or be killed by the streets. Coates experienced in the social aspect when trying to create his personal identity, group violence, personal fear and physical abuse these all shaped Ta – Nehisi Coates into the man he is now.

Mike Rose had a similar but different experience growing up. Rose parents moved from Italy to American in hopes of starting a better life for themselves, when Rose parents first came to America they lived on the east side of America. His mother and father opened a spaghetti house in Pennsylvania that was successful up until the railroad had stop production in the area then the shop had gone bankrupt. Rose says, “My parents managed to salvage seven hundred dollars and, on the advice of the family doctor, headed to California, where the winters would be mild and where I, their seven-year-old son, would have the possibility of a brighter future. Rose had a easier childhood, it was a dreamy childhood but he had the chance to be a kid longer, he was lucky enough that his parents would buy him stuff to stimulate his creativity such as a chemistry set he received on Christmas one year, “One early Christmas they got me a small chemistry set. My father brought home an old card table from the secondhand store, and on that table I spread out my test tubes, my beaker, my Erlenmeyer flask, and my test tubes, my gas-generating apparatus.” Rose had a childhood that wasn’t filled with fear of being jumped or being caught in gang violence because he didn’t fit the criteria so the gang members in his area left him alone. It was much easier to grow up light skinned, being light skinned during this time meant you weren’t discriminated against, suppressed or targeted. That doesn’t mean he didn’t have dangers lurking around his neighborhood.

The types of danger in Rose neighborhood were similar to Coates but they weren’t targeting Rose, if anything happened to him it would have most likely been an accident. There was one story Rose was telling about what he experienced in his neighborhood, “One night I watched as a guy sprinted from Walt’s to toss something on our lawn. The police were right behind, and a cop tackled him, smashing his face into the sidewalk. I ducked out to find the packet: a dozen glassine bags of heroin.” Rose came in contact with drug not only with this situation but with the people that were living with him at the time, one of the guys name was Lester, “… Lester, the toothless cabbie, who several times made overtures to me and who, when he moved, left behind a draw full of syringes and burnt spoons.” Not only did he have drugs around him he also had an old man asking for sexual favors. Rose and Coates had similar dangers during the course of their childhood’s but they both managed to stay away from those dangers and find their way up.

Rose neighborhood compared to Coates sound very similar, they both have a crazy neighborhood shop owner, they both have groups of “bad boys” also called gangs who roam the streets causing trouble. Rose and Coates experienced the same dangers they both could have easily been abducted and they both could have easily been shot or become a drug dealer. But, that didn’t happen to them they stayed safe they took school seriously, but they also had to take the street seriously both simultaneously, taking school seriously might have been the best thing they did to pull them-selves away from the dangers of the streets and neighborhood school kept them safe and allowed them to chart a new path to greatness. They both took seriously, Coates more so than Rose, Coates had to take school seriously or he wouldn’t have been able to work for anyone but the streets. Coates had a harder time because he was battling race and prejudice growing us, out of Coates and Rose Coates was more likely to have become party of the streets than rose. Coates uses this analogy to describe what racisim is and how he thinks it was created.  “But race is the child of racism, not the father.” The but in the sentence refers to a sentence in the paragraph above “In this way, racism is rendered as the innocent daughter of Mother Nature…” How these two sentences are related is as follows, the first sentence gives us the idea that Racism came before race and the daughter of mother nature is Racism.

 

Essay 3 – Draft one

Ryan DeLuca

March 1, 2019

ENG123

Dr. Drown

Draft One

Our social identities aren’t shaped by ourselves, they are shaped by the people around us. From Coates to Rose they both were shaped by their neighborhoods but both in two different ways with similar outcomes. Coates was shaped by the violence surrounding him and his parents fear of seeing him consumed by the drugs and violence of the streets. Coates parents were especially scared for him, Coates parent’s used physical lessons to try and point him in the right direction, “I remember watching him in a kind of daze, awed at the distance between punishment and offense. Later, I would hear it in Dad’s voice—“Either I can beat him, or the police.” Coates parents did what they had to do to ensure he wouldn’t become a statistic, it was difficult to grow up black because in the decade Coates was a child, blacks were still suppressed, discriminated against and targeted simply because of their difference in skin color, Coates adds “Maybe that saved me. Maybe it didn’t. All I know is, the violence rose from the feat like smoke form a fire, and I cannot say weather that violence, even administered in fear and love, sounded the alarm or choked us at the exit.” Coates childhood wasn’t your regular childhood, in his tough neighborhood you had to grow up quickly or you were very likely to join or be killed by the streets. Coates experienced in the social aspect when trying to create his personal identity, group violence, personal fear and physical abuse these all shaped Ta – Nehisi Coates into the man he is now.

Mike Rose had a similar but different experience growing up. Rose parents moved from Italy to American in hopes of starting a better life for themselves, when Rose parents first came to America they lived on the east side of America. His mother and father opened a spaghetti house in Pennsylvania that was successful up until the railroad had stop production in the area then the shop had gone bankrupt. Rose says, “My parents managed to salvage seven hundred dollars and, on the advice of the family doctor, headed to California, where the winters would be mild and where I, their seven-year-old son, would have the possibility of a brighter future. Rose had a easier childhood, it was a dreamy childhood but he had the chance to be a kid longer, he was lucky enough that his parents would buy him stuff to stimulate his creativity such as a chemistry set he received on Christmas one year, “One early Christmas they got me a small chemistry set. My father brought home an old card table from the secondhand store, and on that table I spread out my test tubes, my beaker, my Erlenmeyer flask, and my test tubes, my gas-generating apparatus.” Rose had a childhood that wasn’t filled with fear of being jumped or being caught in gang violence because he didn’t fit the criteria so the gang members in his area left him alone. It was much easier to grow up light skinned, being light skinned during this time meant you weren’t discriminated against, suppressed or targeted. That doesn’t mean he didn’t have dangers lurking around his neighborhood.

The types of danger in Rose neighborhood were similar to Coates but they weren’t targeting Rose, if anything happened to him it would have most likely been an accident. There was one story Rose was telling about what he experienced in his neighborhood, “One night I watched as a guy sprinted from Walt’s to toss something on our lawn. The police were right behind, and a cop tackled him, smashing his face into the sidewalk. I ducked out to find the packet: a dozen glassine bags of heroin.” Rose came in contact with drug not only with this situation but with the people that were living with him at the time, one of the guys name was Lester, “… Lester, the toothless cabbie, who several times made overtures to me and who, when he moved, left behind a draw full of syringes and burnt spoons.” Not only did he have drugs around him he also had an old man asking for sexual favors.

Yoshino Paper – Final

Ryan DeLuca

Feb 2nd, 2019

Eng 123

Dr. Drown

I was in the search for a new concept and a new idea to help me think about Identity. The concept is called “covering”. What does “covering” mean? Covering in my own words is when you hide your true self in order please the people around you or to blend in. Who introduced me to this new concept? His name is Kenji Yoshino, he is “…the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of connotational Law at New York University.” Yoshino is a gay Asian American who has been studying constructional law for a long time and is involved in civil rights. In his reading, he talks about Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation Civil rights and how Civil rights movements in America have scientifically slowed. Yoshino brings in a psychoanalyst to help him with his topic of talking about identities his name is D. W Winnicott, he talks about the difference between your “True self” and your “False self” as well as the consequences a person may experience covering their “True self” for too long.

The term “Covering”, in Yoshinos words, means “to tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream.” Someone would essentially be covering their “True self” and replacing it with their “False self”. Winnicott explores the ideas about “True self” and “False self” and what they do for a person. Winnicott says, “The true self is the self that gives an individual the feeling of being real, which is more than existing; it is finding a way to exist as oneself and to relate to object as oneself, and to have self into which to retreat for relaxation.” The “True self” gives a person a sense of being, a sense of purpose, and allows the person to be who they really are without restrictions. Winnicott explains, “The False Self, in contrast, gives an individual a sense of being unreal, a sense of futility. It mediates the relationship between the True Self and the world.” What this means is the “False self” protects the “True self” from possible rejection or emotional pain, the act of covering is a way to avoid those two factors.

When someone covers their true self, the reason fluctuates with certain circumstances, one of two certain circumstances is a job interview, you want your future boss to see the best you, in this circumstance you would feel the need or want to cover your bad traits or your true self and only show your best self. Essentially covering is, be the person you want to be seen as not the person you are. The second circumstance for covering we will say you live in a very religious society or community and people in that society or community are very deep into their belief that same-sex intimacy is wrong, and you’ve developed a liking towards the same sex in your very religious society or community. To avoid being ousted, or in an extreme case beaten you would want to or need to “Cover” the idea that you have a liking toward someone of the same sex. Yoshino uses a famous example of real-world covering to emphasize that people in the spotlight cover too because they as well were afraid of the backlash it might have caused, “Long after they came out as Lesbians, Rosie O’ Donnell and Mary Cheney still covered, keeping their same-sex partners out of the public eye.” Even though Rosie O’ Donnell and Mary Cheney came out as Lesbians they still covered the fact that they had same-sex lovers simply because it was outside of what was the societal norm.

However, hiding your “True self” for too long can have negative consequences. Specifically, hiding the true self for too long may cause the person to lose the self that they were hiding, or cause the person to blow up and have an episode. Yoshino explains, “At the negative extreme, the false self completely obscures the True Self, perhaps even from the individual herself.” The guy or girl that was covering for his/her job interview, who was showing who he/her isn’t may lose the part of him/her was covering making there “False self” their “True self”. The boy or girl in the very religious community may have some very negative consequences on their mental health, by covering their gay or lesbian identity the boy or girl may fall into severe depression, and without any support from the community the boy or girl may concede to mental pain they might be experiencing from covering their “True self” from their community.

What a society might gain from someone covering their true self is a very hard list to make because I don’t think society would gain much from a person hiding their “True self” and showing everyone their “false self”. But one thing a society might gain from covering is kindness if someone is covering their selfishness and showing their kindness then other people might want to do the same thing. What a society might lose from covering your true self, is a much larger and easier list to make, a society might lose its sense of community, if a bunch of the community members started showing there “false self” and everyone kept doing that there wouldn’t be a sense of community, no one would have the pleasure of yelling at their neighbor for blowing grass on there lawn or throwing their dog crap over the fence. A society might also lose lives from covering, let go back to the religious community the boy or girl who have fallen into severe deportation might start to develop suicidal thoughts and without the help of their community, they might decide to kill themselves.

Covering is a problem in America and that is why Yoshino a Law professor decided to spark the conversation by writing a book that is called “Covering”. Covering is a civil rights issue because some people in the community are expected to cover in simply to make other people in the community happy, some people may be asked to cover because they make the people around them uncomfortable for maybe the clothes they are wearing or their sexual orientation, when it’s a person civil right to be able to wear the clothes they want and to love the person they want.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Work Cited

BARRIOS, BARCLAY. EMERGING: Contemporary Readings for Writers. BEDFORD BKS ST MARTINS, 2010.

Yoshino, Kenji. “The New Civil Rights .” The New Civil RIghts , pp. 479–490.

Yoshino paper – Revised Draft

Ryan DeLuca

Feb 2nd, 2019

Eng 123

Dr. Drown

I was introduced to a new concept and a new idea to think about the new concept is called “covering”. What does “covering” mean? Covering is when you hide your true self in order to blend in or please the people around you or to blend in. Who introduced me into this new concept? His name is Kenji Yoshino, he is “…the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of connotational Law at New York University.” Yoshino is a gay Asian American who has been studying constructional law for a long time and is involved in civil rights, in his reading he talks about Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation Civil rights. Yoshino brings in a person to help him with his topic of talking about identities. This other person is called D. W Winnicott, he talks about the difference between your “True self” and your “False self” as well as the consequences a person may experience hiding their “True self” for too long.

The term “Covering”, in Yoshinos words means “to tone down a disfavored identity to fit into the mainstream.” Someone would essentially be covering their “True self” and replacing it with their “False self”. Winnicott explores the ideas about “True self” and “False self” and what they do for a person. Winnicott says, “The true self is the self that gives an individual the feeling of being real, which is more than existing; it is finding a way to exist as oneself, and to relate to object as oneself, and to have self into which to retreat for relaxation.” The “True self” gives a person a sense of being and allows the person to be who they really are without restrictions. Winnicott explains, “The False Self, in contrast, gives an individual a sense of being unreal, a sense of futility. It mediates the relationship between the True Self and the world.” What this means if the “False self” protects the “True self” from possible rejection or emotional pain.

The reason a person would want to cover their “True self” fluctuates for certain circumstances, I have two examples. The first example will say you are going to a job interview and you would like what might possibly be your new boss to see the best you, so you would feel the need or the want to cover your bad traits whatever they might be and only show your best self, the person you want to be seen as. The second example will involve sexual orientation, let’s say you live in a very religious society or community and people in that society or community are very deep into their belief that same sex intimacy is wrong, and you have developed a liking towards the same sex in your very religious society or community so to avoid being ousted or in an extreme case beaten, you would want to or need to “Cover” the idea that you have a liking toward someone of the same sex.

Hiding your “True self” for too long might cause the person to lose the self that they were hiding or might cause the person to blow up and have an episode. The guy that was covering for his job interview, who was showing who he isn’t may lose the part of him or her was covering making there “False self” their “True self”. The boy or girl in the very religious community may have some very bad effects on their mental health by covering their gay or lesbian identity, the boy or girl may fall into sever depression and without any support from the community the boy or girl may sacrum to mental pain they are experiencing from covering their “True self”.

I think I already elaborated in this a little but what a society might gain from someone hiding their true self is a very hard list to make because I don’t think a society would gain much from a person hiding their “True self” and showing everyone their “false self”. But one thing a society might gain from covering is kindness, if someone is covering their selfishness and showing their kindness then other people might want to do the same thing. What a society might lose from covering your true self, is a much larger and easier list to make, a society might lose its sense of community, if a bunch of the community members started showing there “false self” and everyone kept doing that there wouldn’t be a sense of community, no one would have the pleasure of yelling at their neighbor for blowing grass on there lawn or throwing their dog crap over the fence. A society might also lose lives from covering, let go back to the religious community the boy or girl who have fell into sever deportation might start to develop suicidal thoughts and without the help of their community they might decide to kill themselves.

Covering is a problem in America and that is why Yoshino a Law professor decided to spark the conversation by writing a book that is called “Covering”. Covering is a civil rights issue because some people in the community are expected to cover in simply to make other people in the community happy, some people may be asked to cover because they make the people around them uncomfortable for maybe the clothes they are wearing or their sexual orientation, when it is a person civil right to be able to wear the clothes they want and to love the person they want.

 

 

 

 

 

Work Cited

Yoshino, Kenji. “The New Civil Rights .” The New Civil RIghts , pp. 479–490.

Yoshino Paper – Draft

Ryan DeLuca

Feb 2nd, 2019

Eng 123

Dr. Drown

I was introduced to a new concept that I had never heard of, that new concept is called “covering”. What does covering mean? Covering is when you hide your true self in order to blend in or please the people around you or to blend in. Who introduced me into this new concept? His name is Kenji Yoshino, he is “…the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of connotational Law at New York University.” Yoshino is a gay Asian American who has been studying constructional law for a long time and is involved in civil rights, in his reading he talks about Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation Civil rights. Yoshino brings in another person who talks about the difference between your “True self” and your “False self” as well as the consequences a person may experience using their “False self” for too long.

One question that was given to me to help me think about these concepts was, “What circumstances would a person want or need to cover?” I said, the kinds of circumstances a person would want to or would need to cover would be if you were going to a job interview you would want to cover your bad traits and only show your best self, right? Then I thought of another circumstance, say you are gay and live in a very Christian society and people in the community are very radical about people that go against the bible, you would want to “Cover” your gay identity in order to avoid being beaten or killed in extreme cases.

Another question that I was given to think with was, “What might hiding a part of their identity do to and or for a person?” In the two circumstances.” I stated about the job interview and the gay teen part of the christen community. Yoshino in the middle of his article brought in a man named D.W Winnicott. Winnicott explores the ideas about “True self” and “False self” and what it might do to a person over time. Winnicott says, “The true self is the self that gives an individual the feeling of being real, which is more than existing; it is finding a way to exist as oneself and to relate to object as oneself and to have self into which to retreat for relaxation.” In my own terms, the “True self” is the real you the you that has that bad trait that you are trying to cover from your soon to be boss or the trait you are trying to hide from your Christian community. Winnicott talks about what the “False Self” is, “The False Self, in contrast, gives an individual a sense of being unreal, a sense of futility. It mediates the relationship between the True Self and the world.” The “False Self” is what protects the “True self” from rejection, pain, and sorrow. To some people, the “False self” is what is keeping them alive, but the consequences of using the “False self” for too long may cause the person to explode in anger or severe depression resulting in possible death.

The last question that I was given to answer is, “What might a society gain and lose when a person or type of person covers a part of their identity?” A society may gain happiness, from certain persons covering, if you are a usually a bitter human being but you decide to cover the fact that you are a bitter human the community may gain happiness from he or she is covering their bitterness. But, on the other hand, a society may lose from a person covering is diversity and the many cultures we have in the United States and around the world.